MATRIX MONItoR 


The only source dedicated exclusively to the emerging technologies shaping the future of business and national security.

Built for executives, the Monitor delivers the latest news and expert insights on technology breakthroughs, public policy, and global security in bite-sized summaries.

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  • A new study produced for CISA examines public sector versus private sector ownership of critical infrastructure sectors.
  • DHS released the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Strategy along with CBP importer guidance.
  • A New York Times investigation reveals China's expansive efforts to collect personal data from everday citizens.
  • According to leaked audio from more than 80 internal TikTok meetings, China-based employees have repeatedly accessed nonpublic data about US TikTok users. The company stated a few days later that traffic for all US user data is now being routed through Oracle's cloud infrastructure. Critics say that is still not enough to protect US users' personal data.
  • NASA and SpaceX will start testing strategies to prevent autonomous satellites from colliding with each other as part of the Agency's Starling mission.
  • The Space Force is formally establishing the National Space Intelligence Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio, where it will be co-located with NASIC.
  • China's planned Mars sample return mission is projected to deliver samples to Earth in 2031 - two years ahead of a joint NASA and ESA mission to do the same. Delivering Martian samples to Earth has long been regarded as a major scientific goal of space exploration.
  • A new study shows electric vehicles could be charged on the go via a peer-to-peer system where cars can share charges while driving.
  • A Chinese startup has hired a Japanese semiconductor heavyweight, signaling China's desire to gain a larger share of the global DRAM market, which is currently dominated by US and South Korean players. China's chip industry is growing faster than any other in the world, according to Bloomberg data showing that China's chip firms lead in annual sales growth over the past four quarters.
  • A researcher published a paper encouraging the Chinese military to track, monitor, and possibly hack satellites in the Starlink network.
  • Our parent company, LookingGlass has launched a new Cyber Monitor which includes strategic insights from tactical cyber observers. Sign up for the LookingGlass Cyber Monitor here.
  • America's Frontier Fund was announced this week as a new non-profit designed to enable a whole-of-nation approach to support critical technology that will secure US competitiveness. LookingGlass Chairman Gilman Louie, of In-Q-Tel fame will serve as the CEO.
  • L3Harris could acquire the entity-listed Israeli firm NSO Group, notorious for its controversial Pegasus spyware that has reportedly been used to spy on government officials and other high profile figures around the world.
  • Apple is working to get rid of passwords for good.
  • A Chinese anti-satellite system has mastered deception in a simulated space battle.
  • Between 2019 and 2021, venture capitalists invested ~$35B in biotech companies with advanced platform technologies that have the potential to transform the industry.
  • MIT researchers believe frozen "space bubbles" could help mitigate climate change by preventing some of the sun's rays from reaching the Earth.
  • Small businesses are more at risk to cyber targeting because they do not have cyber insurance and do not believe they are targets according to new research.
  • Our parent company, LookingGlass has launched a new Cyber Monitor which includes strategic insights from tactical cyber observers. Sign up for the LookingGlass Cyber Monitor here.
  • Apple signed a deal for iPhone 14 memory chips with Yangtze Memory Technologies, a Chinese military-linked fab.
  • ASML accused a Beijing-based firm of stealing its trade secrets. And, that firm is regarded by Chinese officials as one of the country's most promising tech ventures.
  • Due to losses from ransomware coverage, brokers and cyber insurance carriers are tightening requirements for applicants to obtain policies.
  • Some military buyers remain distrustful of commercial solutions as a replacement for government-developed systems, despite growing enthusiasm for new space internet services.
  • A bipartisan pair of US senators presented a bill that would establish new rules for cryptocurrency and task oversight of the assets to Commodity Futures Trading Commission.
  • China plans to launch a space solar power plant program in 2028, two years ahead of the original schedule.
  • A surgeon successfully implanted an ear developed and 3D-printed in a lab, for the first time.
  • Our parent company, LookingGlass launched a new Cyber Monitor which includes strategic insights from tactical cyber observers. Sign up for the LookingGlass Cyber Monitor here.
  • Our parent company, LookingGlass launched a new Cyber Monitor which includes strategic insights from tactical cyber observers. Sign up for the LookingGlass Cyber Monitor here.
  • General Nakasone, head of USCYBERCOM, confirmed for the first time that the US had "conducted a series of operations" in response to Russia's invasion of Ukraine.
  • China may have forced Gitee, the Chinese competitor to GitHub, to censor open source code in a move developers worry will obstruct innovation.
  • The price of battery metals used in the production of EVs is expected to drop in the coming years.
  • Researchers made a breakthrough by using quantum teleportation to exchange qubits between distant nodes that do not have a direct connection, paving the way for a quantum internet.
  • The EU is preparing to cut Russia's largest lender, Sberbank, off the SWIFT exchange, as the bloc prepares a sixth package of sanctions.
  • Chinese cybersecurity firm, Qi An Xin Technology Group, accused The NSA of a campaign targeting computers in 45 countries and regions, including China.
  • CSET identified 14 "chokepoint technologies" which are dominated by companies based in the US and other like-minded democracies that are the most difficult for Chinese manufacturers to obtain over domestic versions they deem unreliable.
  • Next5 highlights the key takeaways from The Cipher Brief's quarterly Cyber Initiatives Group Summit.
  • CEO Bryan Ware led a workshop at the World Economic Forum to discuss cybersecurity in space, and co-authored an article to share the findings and solutions for leaders attending Davos.
  • How blockchain is challenging China's censorship regime.
  • John Deere is accelerating the movement towards autonomous farming with the acquisition of AI startup, Light.
  • Satellite antennas are being 3D-printed in space with the help of sunlight.
  • Chip manufacturer, Broadcom is in talks to buy CSP, VMware, which would triple the size of Broadcom's software segment.
  • The Canadian government banned the use of Huawei and ZTE equipment in its 5G networks, becoming the final member of the Five Eyes to restrict the Chinese companies.
  • MITRE has built a prototype framework for ICT supply chain risks, to debut at the 2022 RSAC in San Francisco.
  • The NACD wrote a letter to the SEC with key considerations regarding whether or not boards should be required to disclose which members have cybersecurity expertise.
  • Cyber insurers significantly increased premiums for cyber coverage over the course of 2021 - by 92% YoY according to an industry watchdog.
  • Web3's alternative to exploiting users for data to make a profit can generate more value for both users and platforms.
  • China has re-emerged as a bitcoin mining hub despite the country's complete ban on the practice a year ago.
  • Scientists are growing plants from Earth with soil from the Moon.
  • A growing number of Chinese chip design firms have adopted open source RISC-V in their chip designs as an alternative to Intel's proprietary X86 and Arm's architectures, in order to minimize the impact of US sanctions.
  • Next5 has been acquired by LookingGlass, and Bryan Ware has been appointed to lead the company as CEO.
  • China is using AI to turn a dam project into the world's largest 3D printer.
  • Meta has teamed up with AMD on mobile infrastructure program to develop metaverse-ready RAN.
  • Chinese tech companies are quietly pulling back from doing business in Russia under pressure from US sanctions, despite calls from Beijing for companies to resist.
  • The US Treasury Department sanctioned a virtual currency mixer, citing that North Korea used it to help launder stolen virtual cryptocurrency.
  • Costa Rica's new President Chaves declared a state of emergency due to ransomware.
  • The SEC has begun questioning American companies about the financial impacts of sanctions on Russia over the invasion of Ukraine.
  • A recent investigation highlights that Chinese state-owned railway company CRRC Corp is acquiring and investing in several sensitive defense technologies that supply US and allied militaries, and to date does not fall on the US list of organizations that support the Chinese Military Industrial Complex.
  • The US and 55 other nations signed a political commitment to push rules for the internet shaped by democratic values.
  • The Biden Administration will allocate more than $3B in infrastructure funding to finance electric vehicle battery manufacturing.
  • The world's first airport for electric drones and flying cars  recently opened in the UK.
  • A White House National Security Memo identifies the key steps needed to maintain US competitive advantage in quantum information science.
  • An investigation reveals how military technology reaches Russia in violation of US export controls, highlighting the difficulty in tracking critical technology transportation.
  • Operating under FISA authorities, the FBI searched emails, texts, and other electronic communications of 3.4M US residents without a warrant last year according to this year's annual ODNI transparency report, which included this data for the first time.
  • Next5 leadership hosted a workshop at the World Economic Forum with international executives from WEF's Global Future Councils on Cybersecurity and Space. Findings from this session will be included in an article for ministerial level world leaders attending Davos next month, as well as the Forum's annual Global Risk and Cyber Risk Reports.
  • The Union of Concerned Scientists compiled a Satellite Database of the more than 4,582 operational satellites currently in orbit around Earth.
  • The head of machine learning at Lyft, Craig Martell, is joining the Pentagon to lead its new data and AI office - a post just established in December.
  • Fort Worth, TX is becoming the first city government in the US to mine bitcoin.
  • Chinese drone-maker DJI has suspended all business activities in Russia and Ukraine, becoming the first Chinese technology company to officially halt Russian business activities following its invasion.
  • Honor - which was previously owned by Huawei - builds its products with parts made in the US, accounting for 40% of their manufacturing cost according to recent analysis.
  • Energy companies face higher risk of cyber attacks than other industries according to an IBM report.
  • According to Microsoft, Russian-affiliated hackers were planning cyberattacks against Ukraine as early as March 2021.
  • A Five Eyes advisory warns that more Russian cyber activity is incoming as various cyber crime and cyber threat groups publicly pledged support for the Russian government in retaliation to sanctions.
  • A third senior DoD official resigned from the USG saying the US risks losing its tech edge to China due to slow budgets and bureaucratic tendencies.
  • The White House announced that the US will ban direct-assent ASAT missile tests that create orbital debris, and called on other countries to do the same.
  • The Treasury Department has tied the North Korean hacking group Lazarus to the theft of more than $600M in cryptocurrency from a software bridge used for the popular Axie Infinity play-to-earn game.
  • Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries plans to develop and commercialize nuclear reactors small enough to be delivered on trucks by the end of the next decade.
  • Despite soaring prices, Chinese companies are continuing to invest in second-hand chip manufacturing machines, which are expected to account for 20% of global chip production capacity this year.
  • Xi Jinping plans to invest in the city of Zhuzou as its newest tech hub in hopes of becoming the world's center of innovation over the next ten years.
  • American sanctions against Russia over Ukraine are pushing the world to the brink of recession, and could potentially harm the value of the dollar according to some critics.
  • China has developed a new cyber defense infrastructure that can automatically detect security flaws in orbiting satellites.
  • Nokia is officially exiting the Russian market permanently.
  • Graphite, a critical mineral used in EV batteries, could see a shortage in supply amid surging demand for EVs, which may delay the global drive to reduce the carbon footprint.
  • Toyota subsidiary Woven Planet is following Tesla's lead in attempting to advance self-driving technology through the use of low-cost cameras, noting that testing autonomous vehicles with more expensive sensors like radars and lidars is expensive and not scalable.
  • Huawei, which is already sanctioned by the US, is preparing to exit Russia by furloughing some local employees and suspending new contracts with operators.
  • The USG warned that advanced hackers had demonstrated the ability to gain full system access to multiple ICS systems. And Ukrainian officials announced that it had successfully thwarted a cyber attack by Russian-backed hackers (attributed to Sandworm) aimed at disrupting the country's electrical grid.
  • Putin's invasion of Ukraine is likely to accelerate innovation in climate, energy, and deep technologies.
  • The FBI was granted court orders that allowed it to remove malicious code from privately held computers around the world, sometimes without the owners' consent.
  • Lynk launched the world's first commercial cell-tower-in-space.
  • Western made chips have been discovered in Russian technologies, including surveillance systems and drones currently being used in Russia's invasion of Ukraine, highlighting the difficulty companies face in tracing how their products are used.
  • UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been accused of failing to conduct a promised security investigation into China's largest smartphone assembler Wingtech's controversial takeover of the country's largest semiconductor manufacturer.
  • US and German officials announced that an international law enforcement effort shut down Hydra Market - the world's largest Darknet marketplace, seizing $25M in crypto.
  • Mexican suppliers are gaining ground as manufacturers restructure their supply chains in the face of growing global disruptions.
  • Though Nokia pulled out of Russia, it left behind a vast surveillance system used by the Kremlin to track communications of Russian oppositionists, further highlighting companies' inevitable role in geopolitics.
  • US satellite communications provider Viasat has shared an incident report regarding the cyberattack that affected its KA-SAT consumer-oriented satellite broadband service on February 24 - the day Russia invaded Ukraine.
  • Environmental groups launched a campaign seeking to change bitcoin's code to decrease its energy use, which has grown substantially in the past few years.
  • TSMC and Samsung asked the US to allow foreign companies to participate in the CHIPS Act.
  • China's Huawei said it is still evaluating its response to Western sanctions on Russia.
  • Microsoft's new security chief issued a call to arms to build protection from hackers and criminals in the emerging metvaverse.
  • Russia accused the US and NATO allies of leading a massive campaign of "cyber aggression" behind hundreds of thousands of malicious attacks per day - a claim the US has refuted.
  • Legal experts say SpaceX made Starlink a valid military target by offering additional services to Ukraine that are now enabling it to carry out lethal military functions.
  • A Japanese tech startup says it can deliver physical pain to people in the metaverse.
  • A new CSET report offers four ways that machine learning vulnerabilities differ from traditional cyber vulns.
  • Much of the world's critical infrastructure is heavily dependent on space, which poses a security dilemma, especially by cyber threats.
  • Ukraine accused China's largest drone maker, DJI, of enabling Russia to target Ukrainian drone pilots. While some Ukrainian access to the same technology has gone offline, DJI vehemently denies having anything to do with it.
  • Chinese surveillance giant Hikvision plans to buy a second-hand lithography machine made by ASML for its in-house chip-making operations.
  • Following the White House announcement this week regarding cyber risk to the Homeland, CISA's Shields Up page will be updated with Russian cyber TTPs, and all guidance as the threat and intelligence evolve. Now is the time for organizations to lower the threshold for reporting anomalous cyber activity or incidents. Reports can be submitted directly to CISA by emailing report@cisa.gov or calling 1-888-282-0870.
  • Chinese state officials strategically messaged this past week that Beijing views Taiwan differently than Ukraine.
  • Russian prosecutors issued warnings to Western companies in Russia, threatening to arrest corporate leaders there who criticize the government or to size assets from companies that withdraw from the country.
  • Western intelligence agencies are investigating a satellite internet disruption in Ukraine that occurred the day after Russia invaded Ukraine.
  • Chinese companies are encountering difficulties obtaining cobalt in Congo, a mineral that has become critical to the global transition to cleaner energy.
  • Following the withdrawal of the US from Afghanistan, China has moved to claim the country's vast mineral wealth, which is critical to the production of technologies, including components in EVs.
  • OFAC clarified that US citizens and digital asset firms are required to comply with sanctions against Russia, even when facilitating transactions in cryptocurrency.
  • ODNI released its annual threat assessment calling out China as the top priority for the IC. Testimony from the nation's top intelligence chiefs highlighted concerns over the recent Russian invasion, indicating Putin has not met his military expectations and his interpretation of victory in Ukraine could change over time, given recent setbacks.
  • Space continues to play a prominent role in the Ukraine conflict as Europe suffers an ongoing outage of Viasat services while Starlink quickly recovered from jamming activities via software updates.
  • Researchers combined CRISPR technology with AI to regulate gene activity.
  • A new EV from Alibaba will launch this month, joining a crowded market dominated by Tesla and Chinese firms Xpeng and Nio.
  • Toshiba says, that while some chipmakers have downplayed the impact of disruption from Russia's invasion, the chip shortage will worsen due to ongoing supply chain constraints.
  • Russia has officially surpassed Iran and North Korea to become the world's most sanctioned nation.
  • Google acquired Mandiant for ~$5.4B to bolster its cloud unit with more cybersecurity services.
  • The West imposed significant sanctions namely on Russian banks in retaliation for military action in Ukraine. And the US is sharing intelligence and attributing malicious cyber activity at unprecedented, welcomed speed. Meanwhile, China walked back its support to Putin on Ukraine fearing risks of further worsening relations with Washington and access to US markets.
  • The National Cyber Director called for an unprecedented level of collaboration between government and industry to meet the requirements of national security.
  • Electic vehicles onboard a burning ship in the Atlantic complicated efforts to distinguish the fire since burning batteries cannot be put out with water alone.
  • After China outlawed bitcoin mining, rural states of the US have become the new hub for mining, a move that experts say is likely to spur innovation in the underlying technology.
  • Scientists are developing self-healing biodegradable, 3D-printed materials that sense strain, temperature, and humidity.
  • Debris from the Russian ASAT weapon demonstration in November are creating surges of close approaches, in some cases, tens of thousands a week, with active satellites in LEO.
  • JPMorgan Chase, Toshiba, and Ciena have demonstrated full viability of a first-of-its-kind Quantum Key Distribution network that is resistant to quantum computing attacks.
  • China sanctioned US defense firms Lockheed Martin and Raytheon Technologies for arms sales to Taiwan.
  • The Biden Administration announced new investments in mineral production to address supply chain shortages.
  • The White House is warning the chip industry to diversify its supply chain in case Russia retaliates against threatened US export curbs by blocking access to key materials. Washington is also closely weighing whether and how Beijing might come to Moscow's aid to circumvent technology sanctions.
  • SpaceX said it should be able to reach orbits at significantly lower costs.
  • Intel announced plans to enter the crypto/blockchain market.
  • French President Macron refused to take a Russian COVID test prior to his high profile visit with Putinto discuss Ukraine. His staff said he refused in order to prevent Russia from obtaining his DNA. German Chancellor Scholz also refused a Russia-administered COVID PCR test.
  • Former chief of MI6, Sir Alex Younger, is pressuring the British government to keep Arm Holdings in the UK in order to compete with China and the US in key technologies.
  • ASML, the world's leader in lithography - a vital step in chip production - accused a Chinese company of IP infringement. According to ASML, the company - "little giant" Dongfang Jingyuan Electron, is associated with failed company XTAL, which was found guilty of stealing ASML's IP in the US in 2013.
  • The White House added five new technology areas to its list of Critical Emerging Technologies to serve as a resource for future policy on US technological leadership.
  • SpaceX lost 40 Starlink satellites it launched last week due to a geomagnetic storm, in the largest number of lost satellites knocked out by a single geomagnetic event ever.
  • US telecom carriers have requested $5.6B in reimbursements form the government to rip and replace their existing Huawei or ZTE infrastructure.
  • The US denied China's claim that Starlink satellites twice endangered its space station.
  • Scientists believe mRNA could serve as the foundation for a new generation of vaccines - a technology the Chinese were originally reluctant to adopt but are now racing to develop domestically. Meanwhile, Moderna and GWU just administered the first doses of HIV vaccines in a clinical trial, leveraging mRNA technology.
  • China is establishing a special organization that will facilitate collaboration between domestic firms and overseas semiconductor powerhouses like Intel, AMD, Infineon Technologies, and ASML.
  • A WEF report explains how a cyber attack on critical energy infrastructure could have far-reaching consequences for business operations and the European economy.
  • Russia arrested six people this week - all allegedly part of a hacking group involved in stealing and selling credit cards - in the third hacking group arrested by Russian authorities since the beginning of the year.
  • Japan revealed that it is nearly twice as dependent on Chinese imports as the US making it highly vulnerable to supply-side limitations in China.
  • FBI Director Wray called the threat from China "more brazen, more damaging than ever before" in a speech this week, where he highlighted how the PRC & CCP leverage unfair practices like cyber theft to surpass the US technologically for strategic economic advantage.
  • M&A in the game industry more than tripled in 2021, giving game makers additional ways to compete with each other as the metaverse comes to fruition.
  • New research from CSET suggests that deep learning will soon face a slowdown in its ability to consume computing power.
  • The FCC revoked China Unicom's authority to operate in the US, citing national security concerns within 60 days.
  • The SEC approved the US' 17th stock exchange - a subsidiary of Boston-based BOX Exchange. Known as BSTX, the new exchange will incorporate blockchain technology.
  • A highly anticipated lawsuit against Ripple Labs is challenging US financial laws that decide what is a security and whether or not existing laws can effectively regulate crypto.
  • A CNAS wargame tests the dynamics of the US-China strategic semiconductor competition and Taiwan's role in it.
  • The US House of Representatives is taking up a $52B bill aimed at improving competition with China and supporting the US semiconductor industry, known as the America COMPETES Act of 2022.
  • Thanks in part to US sanctions, Apple has taken market share away from Huawei in China as it makes record smartphone sales rising to the #1 smartphone provider in the country.
  • The WTO authorized China to impose retaliatory tariffs totaling $645M on US imports, after China complained about US tariffs on solar panels and other products produced in China with unfair subsidies to state-owned enterprises.
  • Recent events in space highlight a new race is already underway. Next5 breaks down the strategic implications of these events and makes five recommendations for US policymakers to ensure we maintain US leadership in space in our latest article.
  • In an op/ed Anthony Vinci and Nadia Schadlow argue the next generation Internet - Web3 - could shift the balance of power back to individuals in a victory for democracy amidst increasing competition with authoritarian states, if the US embraces it.
  • A new report ranks the US first out of 160 nations in readiness to implement AI in public services delivery to citizens.
  • A European watchdog warns that the EU faces economic and security risks unless member countries increase cooperation on 5G in a new report.
  • Intel announced plans to construct a $20B massive chip manufacturing site in Ohio.
  • In light of looming sanctions on Russia, US businesses - especially those in the energy sector - are urging the Biden Administration to allow companies to fulfill commitments and weigh exempting products as it crafts any sanctions, saying US businesses could suffer economic consequences, too.
  • The EU launched a WTO case against China for "discriminatory trade practices" against Lithuania over its efforts to strengthen relations with Taipei.
  • In response to recent malicious cyber activity in Ukraine, CISA released additional guidance this week to help organizations protect against "Potential Critical Threats" as the crisis evolves. US officials anticipate cyber attacks will continue to play a role in any potential invasion of Ukraine, which could have cascading or spillover effects worldwide.
    Next5 advises companies to review detection response plans now, as tensions rise, particularly those in industry sectors that are likely to be targeted or leveraged by US actions. If the US takes action that targets a specific industry, American companies in that industry should assume they are ripe targets for reciprocal Russian retaliation. For more information about Russian TTPs, detection, and mitigation procedures, read this joint guidance released by CISA, FBI, and NSA we featured last week. Those seeking further information are encouraged to set up a meeting with the Next5 team to discuss.
  • Microsoft is buying video game heavyweight Activision Blizzard in an all cash deal for $75B, which is set to play a role in its towards the metaverse.
  • According to a new CSIS report, the IC needs to change the way it defines intelligence and adopt cloud computing to stay ahead of adversaries, private interests, and the public.
  • Microsoft, Alphabet, Meta, and Amazon have become dominant users of undersea cable capacity by far.
  • In an interim intelligence assessment, CIA says it has ruled out that Havana Syndrome is the result of a sustained global campaign by a hostile power aimed at hundreds of US officials, and still has not found the root cause of symptoms. Critics say the CIA did not consult with enough IC partners (to include the DoD) in making its assessment, and it was pretty loose about which symptoms qualified as possible cases - all but guaranteed to skew the data.
  • Members of the Russia-based cyber ransomware group REvil, which was responsible for many significant ransomware attacks against US companies last year, have been reportedly arrested by the SVR.
  • China sees supply chain decoupling from the US as one of the greatest risks to its security and power, according to a Chinese think tank and Chinese officials.
  • Anticipating a Russian invasion into Ukraine, the US Senate (with White House backing) unveiled a bill with plans for sweeping sanctions. The US Government also anticipates cyber attacks will play a role in any invasion which could have cascading effects worldwide. CISA, FBI, & NSA jointly released guidance with Russian TTPs, detection, and mitigation procedures to help organizations prepare.
    Next5 advises companies to review detection response plans now, as tensions rise, particularly those in industry sectors that are likely to be targeted or leveraged by US actions. If the US takes action that targets a specific industry, American companies in that industry should assume they are ripe targets for reciprocal Russian retaliation. Those seeking further information are encouraged to set up a meeting with the Next5 team to discuss.
  • SpaceX is drawing scrutiny over safety concerns after its satellites were involved in thousands of close encounters every week by the end of 2021.
  • CSIS argues that the delay in rolling out 5G across the US is damaging strategic interests.
  • A man received a genetically modified pig's heart in the first successful transplant of a pig heart into a human body.
  • Chinese semiconductor startups failed to compete with prominent chip manufacturers due to lack of funding and experience.
  • US sanctions have boosted mainland China's demand for Taiwanese chips, sending Taiwan exports to new highs.
  • Chinese critical infrastructure and government organizations are routinely being compromised by Russian-speaking ransomware criminals, and China is uniquely positioned to counter ransomware for all.
  • Throughout 2021, Next5 convened 100+ executive experts in emerging technology and policy to discuss the future of innovation, business, and world power. Based on the insights we gleaned from them, we identified the top 5 trends to watch in this space going into 2022 and beyond, which you can read here.
  • Chinese social media giant TikTok unseated Google as the most used search engine in the world.
  • AT&T and Verizon agreed to delay their 5G rollout in the US at the request of Transportation Department leadership.
  • Scientists believe that zero gravity conditions of outer space could be the key to advancing regenerative medicine and facilitating mass production of stem cells.
  • John Deere unveiled the world's first autonomous tractor it hopes will be the future of precision agriculture.
  • China is slated to fail on its commitments to the 2020 trade deal with the US, which expires today, but Biden's response - if retaliatory, could ultimately harm US businesses operating in China; and if too weak, could signal to Beijing that the new administration won't hold them accountable to similar terms in the future.
  • Russian businessman Vladislav Kyushin, who is on trial in the US for fraud, could prove a treasure trove of intelligence on Russian interference in US elections. Even if he doesn't cooperate with US officials, his arrest in the Alps and extradition to the US signals that Russian criminals do not have freedom of movement outside the motherland.